Friday, August 23, 2019

Amnesty International: Brazilian Government’s Failures are Fueling Wildfires Across the Amazon

By Native News Online Staff - August 23, 2019 at 12:03AM

Published August 23, 2019

NEW YORK — Responding to the news of the wildfires that have been raging in the Amazon rainforest for several weeks, Kumi Naidoo, Secretary General of Amnesty International said:

“The responsibility to stop the wildfires that have been raging in the Amazon rainforest for several weeks now lies squarely with President Bolsonaro and his government. They must change their disastrous policy of opening up the rainforest for destruction, which is what has paved the way for this current crisis.

“Earlier this year Amnesty International documented illegal land invasions and arson attacks near Indigenous territories in the Amazon, including Rondônia state where many of the fires are raging.

“Deforestation in the territories Amnesty visited has doubled this year compared to the same time period in 2018 because of illegal invaders who are felling trees, starting forest fires and attacking Indigenous communities living there.

“Despite this, President Bolsonaro has deliberately sought to weaken protections of the rainforest and undermine the rights of the one million Indigenous Peoples who live there.

“Now that the city of São Paulo, thousands of kilometers away from the Amazon, has been shrouded in darkness from the resulting smoke plume, the President has tried to smear NGOs with the slander that they started the fires.

“Instead of spreading outrageous lies or denying the scale of deforestation taking place, we urge the President to take immediate action to halt the progress of these fires. This is essential to protect people’s right to a healthy environment, as well as their right to health given the impact on air quality over wide swathes of Brazil and neighboring countries.

“And for the rest of the world wondering what they can do to protect the Amazon, campaigning for the protection of the human rights of Indigenous Peoples is key to preventing further deforestation.

“We must stand together behind the Indigenous communities and leaders across the Amazon region – from Brazil to Ecuador and beyond. For them the Amazon is more than the lungs of the world, it is their home.”

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Navajo Nation Settles Lawsuit against Wells Fargo Bank

By Native News Online Staff - August 23, 2019 at 12:02AM

Wells argo Bank in Window Rock, Arizona on Navajo Nation. Photo by Navajo Times.

Published August 23, 2019

WINDOW ROCK — On Thursday, the Navajo Nation Office of the President and Vice President announced a settlement with Wells Fargo Bank, settling the Navajo Nation’s lawsuit detailing the Bank’s long campaign of predatory and unlawful practices that targeted and harmed the Navajo people. Under the terms of the settlement, Wells Fargo will pay the Navajo Nation $6.5 million dollars.

“Wells Fargo’s predatory actions defrauded and harmed the Nation,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. “We held Wells Fargo accountable for their actions and we will continue to hold other companies accountable if their business practices do not respect our people — this puts other companies on notice that harmful business practices against the Navajo people will not be tolerated.”

The Nation originally filed suit in United States District Court in December 2017. The complaint detailed a long pattern of misconduct by Wells Fargo, and brought claims under the Federal Consumer Financial Protection Act (CFPA), claims under other federal consumer protection laws, and claims under state, tribal and common law.  The Nation also filed a separate lawsuit in Navajo Nation District Court reasserting its tribal and common law claims.

“The Wells Fargo settlement compensates the Nation, as well as avoids the uncertainty and expense of continued litigation,” said Navajo Nation Attorney General Doreen N. McPaul.  “Our litigation team at the Department of Justice, led by Assistant Attorney General Paul Spruhan, handled the tribal court litigation and he and Assistant Attorney General Jana Werner from our Tax and Finance Unit coordinated with our outside counsel on the federal case.”

“We are proud of our work for the Navajo Nation and for securing this important settlement,” said Hueston Hennigan partner John C. Hueston, who handled the federal litigation along with Hueston Hennigan partner Moez M. Kaba.

Wells Fargo also reached a multi-state settlement with the attorney generals of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2018.

“The Nation is pleased with the settlement, and proud that our attorneys were able to secure more for the Navajo Nation in settlement than any other state with comparable populations,” said Navajo Nation Vice President Lizer.

The Navajo Nation is represented by Attorney General Doreen N. McPaul, Assistant Attorneys General Paul Spruhan and Jana Werner of the Navajo Nation Department of Justice, and John C. Hueston and Moez M. Kaba of Hueston Hennigan LLP.

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The Museum at Warm Springs Hosts Huckleberry Harvest Celebration & Honor Dinner at High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon

By Native News Online Staff - August 23, 2019 at 12:00AM

More than 200 guests attended The Museum At Warm Springs Huckleberry Harvest Celebration
and Honor Dinner at the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon on Saturday, August 17, 2019.
Photo Credit: Creative Images of Life

Published August 23, 2019

Event raises $105,000 for the Museum to share Warm Springs culture, history and art

WARM SPRINGS, Ore. — More than 200 guests attended The Museum At Warm Springs’ Huckleberry Harvest Celebration and Honor Dinner at the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon on Saturday evening, August 17, 2019. The annual event raises funds for The Museum At Warm Springs.

The Warm Springs people have harvested huckleberries in the Mount Hood area since time immemorial. In the 1855 Middle Oregon Treaty that established the Warm Springs Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs ceded 10 million acres of land to the United States on which Mount Hood stands. In the treaty, the Tribes reserved the right to pick berries and to retain additional rights, including fishing, hunting, grazing stocks and gathering plants and medicines.

This year, $105,000 was raised through dinner ticket sales, sponsorships, additional grants and gifts, and a silent auction. “Proceeds from the event makes it possible for the Museum to continue to share the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs’ culture, history and art; to educate in the traditional arts of the people; and to preserve the Museum’s objects and archival collections,” said Museum Executive Director Elizabeth Woody (Warm Springs).

“Each year, our guests are given an opportunity to be immersed in the beauty and culture of our Tribes,” said Woody. “Traditional foods, music and art make this a unique event, one that we look forward to celebrating year after year.”

This year’s guest speaker was Dr. Phillip Cash Cash (Nez Perce/Cayuse). A renowned linguist and scholar, Cash Cash spoke to the importance of Indigenous language preservation in a presentation titled, “The Radical New Plateau Speaker.”

This year’s event included two honorees. Howard Arnett, Esquire of Karnopp Petersen LLP, Bend was honored with the Museum’s prestigious Twanat Award for his nearly four decades as an attorney for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, and for his representation of other tribes on matters involving treaty rights, tribal sovereignty, Indian law development, government-to-government relations and gaming. Arnett is also a longtime supporter of The Museum At Warm Springs.

Dr. Virginia Beavert of the Yakama Nation was honored with the Museum’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Beavert is a Linguist/Scholar and Professor at the University of Oregon. She is a highly respected teacher and fluent speaker of her language, Yakama Sahaptin. Beavert has worked throughout her life to teach and preserve her Native language. She has been the Washington State Educator of the Year and in 2004 was honored by the Indigenous Language Institute for her lifetime of work on language revitalization. Beavert was awarded her Ph.D. in Linguistics in 2012.

On Sunday, August 18, at the High Desert Museum, The Museum At Warm Springs and the Confluence Project recorded Cash Cash and Beavert in conversation in Ichiskin and English. Native filmmakers Woody Hunt (Modoc/Cherokee) and LaRonn Katchia (Warm Springs) taped the three-hour storytelling and cultural presentation.

Elizabeth Woody, Warm Springs, Executive Director of The Museum At Warm Springs,
welcomes guests to the Huckleberry Harvest Celebration and Honor Dinner at the High Desert
Museum in Bend, Oregon on Saturday, August 17, 2019.
Photo Credit: Creative Images of Life

The event’s major sponsors included: The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Ken Smith, Karnopp Petersen LLP, University of Oregon, The Confederated Tribes of Siletz, Central Oregon Landwatch, Brooks Resources, Empire Construction, ASI Wealth Management, Oxford Suites and Inns, Pahlisch Homes, Portland General Electric (PGE), Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprise, The Gordon Family, Sunriver Resort, City of Bend, Miller Lumber, and Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

Warm Springs Chief Delvis Heath, Warm Springs Tribal Council Chairman Raymond Tsumpti, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Tribal Council Chairman Delores Pigsley and other Siletz Tribal Council members were among the dignitaries who attended. Citizens of the Coquille Indian Tribe, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Modoc, Nez Perce Tribe, Tohono O’odham Nation and Yakama Nation also joined the evening’s celebration.

Distinguished non-tribal guests at the event included: Oregon Supreme Court Justice Martha Walters, Bend Mayor Sally Russell, Bend City Councilor Bruce Abernethy, Bend City Manager Eric King, Dennis Pahlisch of Pahlisch Homes, Bend and Kirk Schueler, CEO, Brooks Resources Corp.

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When and How Much Parents Should Help With Homework

By Native News Online Staff - August 23, 2019 at 12:00AM

Published August 23, 2019

With the advancement in technology, homework is sure of getting a whole new makeover. Many parents and guardians argue, should kids have homework when the focus should be on interactive learning. The education system worldwide needs to undergo a transformation and bid farewell to rote learning forever. With the increased competition and the world getting smaller day-by-day, homework is on the verge of becoming more or less a form of child abuse. On the other hand, there are many examples of how homework helps in reducing child abuse, and researchers are compiling the same in the targeted essay. Many essays on child abuse topic can be found online which address not only regular child abuse essay topics but also stringent homework and deadlines, which are only shortening the period of childhood that kids get to enjoy.

Ways parents can help with homework of their children

Parents don’t need to wrestle over a child abuse essay to see or at least start wondering how they can help their children enjoy the golden years of their lives fully and appreciatively. But it is essential to draw the line here. So, here are a few ways in which parents can help children with their homework:

1.     Encourage free creativity

Kids have an uncanny potential of surprising not just their parents but also their teachers when allowed to exert their imagination and creativity. Let your children feel free to express by encouraging unrestricted thinking and allowing them to come up with solutions for their homework problems innovatively. This not only makes their homework a fun activity but also helps them in keeping their minds sharp and enlivens their innocent spirits. Encourage your children to rethink the problem in their way, allow them to interpret it in the most relatable manner by using their everyday activities or toys and then come up with an approach to solve it.

2.     Research outdoors

There are certain topics that students when asked to ram up in closed wall classrooms, detest automatically. Parents helping with homework can rectify this situation by taking the education outdoors at every opportunity. Bringing help with homework outdoors, especially when it comes to subjects like science and mathematics because fresh air only stimulates the brain. Take your children on a hike through the wild backyard to look for leaves and study the insects for biology homework. Relate the mathematics problems with games that help them understand the topics and solve them instantly. Scientific studies have shown that children are much more responsive and have higher retention ability when studying in the open. This also comes with an added advantage of bonding time with your children.

3.     Entail professional help

Should parents help with homework? In case a student is weak in a particular subject, parental help may only make things worse. The reason is that in such scenarios, children need additional professional help from a tutor who is well versed in the said subject. There are instances when parents end up confusing their children even further or are weak themselves in certain subjects, which inevitably is detrimental to the children. Hence, it is better to entail extra help to nip the problem in the bud and straighten up the concepts for your children at the ripe age. Still, to look for some decent essay examples online, in case the child is struggling with one, is a task that every parent can cope with.

4.     Technology and aesthetics

Often students struggle with writing paper on topics that are baffling to them in the very first place. One of the best homework tips for parents is to help students in such topics by showing them videos and other interactive media on the internet. For instance, the precipitation cycle and the photosynthesis can be made much easier to understand by using video samples on the internet to help children with their visualization. This is an effective strategy for the students, however, it should be noted here that young kids should not develop an addiction to gadgets at the same time. Striking a balance is the key here.

5.     Set time frame

A major issue with children today is that even they have become habitual to become stressful and pile up pressure on themselves. Such scenarios can only be remedied by parents setting up the time frame for homework while keeping slots for pure recreation and sports. This also helps students who tend to procrastinate to get back to work and get the most done during the hours meant only for school work.

The situation with homework can be made much simpler with the help of parents. However, it is imperative to strike a balance between leading and helping. Keep your children at the steering wheel while you tag along only to help when they get stuck. Enhance the leadership of your children and let them learn to deal with the stress productively.

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Thursday, August 22, 2019

Cherokee Nation Chief Hoskin Announces the Appointment of a Cherokee Nation Delegate to Congress

By Native News Online Staff - August 22, 2019 at 11:37PM

Cherokee Nation Vice President of Government Relations Kim Teehee speaks on how honored she is to be nominated by Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. as the first-ever nominee to represent the tribe as a delegate in U.S. Congress.

Published August 22, 2019 

Vice President of Government Relations Kim Teehee chosen as nominee for the position

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. announced Thursday that the tribe is taking an historic initial step to enact the Cherokee Nation’s treaty right to send a delegate to the U.S. Congress.

The Cherokee Nation delegate is referenced in both the Treaty of Hopewell from 1785 and Treaty of New Echota from 1835 between the Cherokee Nation and federal government. The Treaty of 1866 also reaffirms all previous treaties between the Cherokee Nation and United States.

Chief Hoskin’s Congressional delegate nomination is part of his “First 100 Days in Office” initiatives and is aimed at strengthening the tribe’s sovereignty.

“As Native issues continue to rise to the forefront of the national dialogue, now is the time for Cherokee Nation to execute a provision in our treaties. It’s a right negotiated by our ancestors in two treaties with the federal government and reaffirmed in the Treaty of 1866, and reflected in our Constitution. At Cherokee Nation, we are exercising our treaty rights and strengthening our sovereignty,” Chief Hoskin said. “We know this is just the beginning and there is much work ahead, but we are being thorough in terms of implementation and ask our leaders in Washington to work with us through this process and on legislation that provides the Cherokee Nation with the delegate to which we are lawfully entitled.”

Chief Hoskin said the Cherokee Nation has been committed to honoring its treaty obligations and hopes the federal government will follow suit.

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. announces that the tribe is taking an historic initial step to enact the Cherokee Nation’s treaty right to send a delegate to the U.S. Congress during press conference Thursday. Chief Hoskin also announce he selected Vice President of Government Relations Kim Teehee as nominee for new post.

“The Cherokee Nation honors its treaties with the United States.  Whether the United States will likewise honor its promises to the Cherokee Nation is a question that only its elected leaders can answer,” Chief Hoskin said.

Chief Hoskin also announced he is nominating Kim Teehee, the tribe’s current vice president of government relations, to serve as the delegate. Teehee’s nomination must be confirmed by the Council of the Cherokee Nation at a special meeting Aug. 29.

“Kim Teehee has worked for years advocating in Congress, on a bi-partisan basis, for the interests of Cherokee Nation and is supremely qualified for this post,” Chief Hoskin said. “We are eager to take the recommendation before the Council of the Cherokee Nation and work with our Congressional delegation from Oklahoma to move this historic appointment forward.”

Cherokee Nation Vice President of Government Relations and Congressional Delegate Nominee Kim Teehee.

Before being named the tribe’s vice president of government relations in 2014, Teehee served President Barack Obama as the first-ever senior policy advisor for Native American affairs in the White House Domestic Policy Council for three years. Prior to serving in the White House, she was senior advisor to the U.S. House of Representatives Native American Caucus Co-Chair, Rep. Dale Kildee D-MI. Serving the bi-partisan caucus for nearly 12 years, she established an impressive record of accomplishments on a wide array of Native American issues, including appropriations, education, economic development, energy, health care, housing, agriculture and transportation.

Teehee said she is proud Chief Hoskin has taken the initiative to exercise the tribe’s treaty right and honored to be chosen as the first-ever nominee to represent the tribe as a delegate in Congress.

“This is a historic moment for Cherokee Nation and our citizens. I am truly humbled Chief Hoskin has nominated me for this extraordinary responsibility,” Teehee said. “I remain supportive of his vision for the future of our tribal government and grateful for the opportunity to serve the great Cherokee Nation. This journey is just beginning and we have a long way to go to see this through to fruition. However, a Cherokee Nation delegate to Congress is a negotiated right that our ancestors advocated for, and today, our tribal nation is stronger than ever and ready to defend all our constitutional and treaty rights. It’s just as important in 2019 as it was in our three treaties.”

Teehee said the Cherokee Nation will continue working with the Oklahoma delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives to move this appointment forward.

The post Cherokee Nation Chief Hoskin Announces the Appointment of a Cherokee Nation Delegate to Congress appeared first on Native News Online.



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Democratic National Committee Native American Caucus statement on climate change

By DNC Native Caucus - August 22, 2019 at 04:55PM

Caucus leadership will vote to support a separate, stand-alone debate of the Presidential candidates regarding climate change



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Navajo Nation, Wells Fargo reach settlement after ‘harmful business practices’

By Jourdan Bennett-Begaye - August 22, 2019 at 03:33PM

Navajo President Jonathan Nez said he will hold bank “accountable”



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