Sunday, January 26, 2020

Kobe Bryant killed in a helicopter crash

By Dalton Walker - January 26, 2020 at 05:30PM

The basketball world is reeling after news of Bryant’s untimely death and Bryant’s 13-year-old daughter. He was 41.



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Canyon Records label is more than 'empty words'

By ASU Cronkite - January 26, 2020 at 12:37PM

The record company has had a long run with Grammy-nominated music by Native people



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Saturday, January 25, 2020

Project with SRP Leaves 300 MW for Nation to Develop

By Arlyssa Becenti - January 25, 2020 at 04:03PM

Published January 25, 2020

Editor’s Note: This aricle was first bublished by the Navajo Times. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. In his address to the Arizona State Legislature last week in honor of Indian Nations and Tribes Legislative Day, President Jonathan Nez said that partnering with SRP on a 200-megawatt solar project is “the new vision for energy development for the Navajo people … (and) what’s good for the Navajo Nation is good for Arizona.”

“We are all going to develop a project on Navajo, a renewable energy project, a solar project that we can create 200 megawatts and bring in additional revenue,” said Nez to the Times about the partnership between SRP and the Nation. “There are folks coming to us who are pitching their projects.”

The Hayoołkaał proclamation that Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer issued last year prioritized renewable energy development. And since a Navajo Nation Energy Office has yet to be established, Nez said that his administration’s Hayoołkaał Work Group has vetted the proposals of various groups who want to utilize the 500 megawatts of electrical transmission the Nation acquired with the closing of Navajo Generating Station.

The project with SRP probably won’t be ready to go until 2023, Nez said. As for the remaining 300 megawatts, Nez said the Nation would be doing its own request for proposals, which is a big deal. Since it is a competitive market, Nez couldn’t share the list of the companies who have sent in proposals.

“The Hayoołkaał group has done some really great work,” he said. “We’ve done a lot.”

The Háyoołkááł Work Group focuses on energy initiatives and other issues. The work group is comprised of officials from the Navajo Nation Division of Natural Resources, Department of Justice, Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Economic Development, Division of Community Development, Navajo Nation Washington Office, and the Office of the President and Vice President.

Once the Hayoolkaal group vets the proposals, the companies will have to go before Council to negotiate leases and waivers of sovereign immunity, Nez explained.

“This project is critical as it moves us forward in our goal to invest in more solar energy projects and offer our customers a diverse mix of affordable, emission-free power,” said SRP General Manager and CEO Mike Hummel. “We are also proud to work with the Navajo Nation as they facilitate further development of renewable energy.”

Michelle Henry with Division of Natural Resources, who is one of the members of the Hayoolkal work group, said it was the proclamation that “set the stage” for this eventual partnership with SRP.

“We’ve had a long relationship with the owners of Navajo Generating Station and they wanted to continue with that relationship,” said Henry. “They reached out to the Nation and that’s how the ball started rolling, and the talk about developing a 200-megawatt project began.”

Henry said DNR has received at least 20 proposals from different companies wanting to use a portion of the 500 megawatts. When vetting company proposals, the work group considers if the company is able to sustain itself, viability of the project, the reputation of the company and the returns it would give to Navajo.

Henry said they had met with SRP at least four times before they decided to partner with it on the 200 megawatts. Just recently the group met with the Resource and Development Committee to provide updates of what the group is working on, she said.

“This throws us at the forefront of renewable energy transition,” said Henry. “What President talked to the legislators about, that transition from coal to renewable. Coal hasn’t been forgotten and its still a viable source; it still generates revenue today. But we want to find that balance between renewable energy and coal.”

SRP, a community-based, not-for-profit public utility, serves more than one million customers. It is asking respondents to provide competitive solar project proposals that are a minimum of 100 megawatts and up to 200 megawatts in size. Proposed projects must be able to achieve commercial operation by no later than December of 2023 so projects may take advantage of expiring federal tax incentives.

RFPs must be submitted to SRP by May 4, 2020. Selection of new resources is expected to be completed by July 2020.

The post Project with SRP Leaves 300 MW for Nation to Develop appeared first on Native News Online.



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Oklahoma State Superintendant Thanks Tribes for Investing in State Education

By Chickasaw Nation Media - January 25, 2020 at 03:50PM

Tribal leaders at the Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes stand with gift baskets presented by the Cherokee Nation, which hosted their quarterly meeting Jan. 10 at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa. From left, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr., Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Chief Gary Batton, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief David Hill, Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby and Seminole Nation of Oklahoma Chief Greg Chilcoat.

Published January 25, 2020

CATOOSA, Okla. – Oklahoma’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister thanked the state’s tribes for their contributions to the state’s educational goals at a quarterly meeting of the Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes January 10. The quarterly meeting was hosted by the Cherokee Nation at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa.

“My heart is filled with gratitude for the service and the prioritization that you have made over the years for the school children of Oklahoma,” Hofmeister said.

Hofmeister said since the beginning of her term in 2014 the state’s tribes have invested more than $575.8 million in gaming funds to the state’s education system.

“These contributions have steadily risen, despite tribal nations receiving no state subsidies to the gaming industry,” Hofmeister said.

Oklahoma’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister thanked the state’s tribes for their investment in Oklahoma’s education system at a Jan. 10 quarterly meeting of the Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes.

She said these contributions have also been supplemented by Oklahoma’s Native American tribes, both monetarily and through their educational programs and services.

“On behalf of the State of Oklahoma, again, thank you,” Hofmeister said. “Thank you for supporting public education.”

In addition, the council passed a resolution honoring Lisa Billy for her service as Secretary of Native American Affairs for the State of Oklahoma.

Billy recently resigned from her gubernatorial appointed position following the compact renegotiation dispute between the tribes and Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt. Billy currently serves as a legislator for the Chickasaw Nation.

“Today, we thank Lisa Billy for her integrity and legacy for tribal advocacy, and we look forward to seeing how she will use her talents for leadership and politics in the future,” said Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby.

Billy was presented with a medal, a drum and a copy of the resolution honoring her.

“We are mighty in our message of unity,” Billy said. “We continue to move forward.”

Tribal leaders said the state’s many Native American tribes are committed to each other, their communities and their state.

“We are united for Oklahoma,” said Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Chief Gary Batton.

Other tribal leaders echoed Chief Batton’s message of unity. Seminole Nation of Oklahoma Chief Greg Chilcoat said the tribes work, communicate and move forward together.

Newly-elected Muscogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief David Hill said the Muscogee (Creek) Nation stands with all tribal nations in the state.

“I’m looking forward to working with each one of you to ensure our partnership is strong and our voices are heard as one,” Principal Chief Hill said.

Tribal leaders said tribal programs and services help more than just the citizens of their respective tribes. They help all Oklahomans.

“Construction and operation of programs and services, combined with governmental and business endeavors, as well as philanthropic and infrastructure projects, make the Chickasaw Nation a crucial driver in the economic activity in our area and in Oklahoma,” said Governor Anoatubby. He said these economic benefits are offered by all of the state’s tribes.

“The five tribes are the best friends that the state of Oklahoma has ever had,” said Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr.

The council voted for Principal Chief Hoskin and Principal Chief Hill as the council’s new president and vice president, respectively, in a routine changing of officers. Terri Haney was reelected as council treasurer.

In addition to the resolution honoring Billy, the council passed five other resolutions:

– A resolution supporting restoration of the Earned Income Tax Credit.

– A resolution urging the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), Office of Justice PROGRAMS United States Department of Justice, to hold a tribal consultation and develop an OJJDP tribal policy in conformance with the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018.

– A resolution urging congress to reauthorize the Special Diabetes Program for Indians.

– A resolution urging renewal of the Oklahoma Advisory Council on Indian Education Act.

– A resolution supporting Oklahoma State Department of Health adoption of immunization rule changes.

The post Oklahoma State Superintendant Thanks Tribes for Investing in State Education appeared first on Native News Online.



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Top 10 Stories: What Indian Country read this past week as of January 25, 2020

By Vincent Schilling - January 25, 2020 at 09:21AM

These are the top stories accessed by our readers from the past week



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Friday, January 24, 2020

#NativeNerd reviews: 'Parasite,' 'Judy,' 'Aeronauts,' ‘The Gentlemen’ and more

By Vincent Schilling - January 24, 2020 at 11:34PM

Native cultural appropriation in Parasite, the tragedy of Judy Garland and the surprising thrill-ride of Aeronauts, also Spies in Disguise, and The Gentlemen



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Former Shakopee tribal chairman is ready to take flight

By Kolby KickingWoman - January 24, 2020 at 06:08PM

Tribal leader didn’t intend to be a leader and did it for his community



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